Home / Guides / Fall Arts Guide 2016 / 2016 Fall Arts Guide Calendar

2016 Fall Arts Guide Calendar

Sep. 6, 2016
Google plus Linkedin Pinterest

OPENING:

“The Magnificents Monthly Musical Showcase”

Dead Man’s Carnival

Sept. 1 


“First Friday Variety Show”

Dead Man’s Carnival

The Miramar Theatre

2844 N. Oakland Ave.

Sept. 2 

Dead Man’s Carnival is the mongrelized offspring of vaudeville, burlesque and do-it-yourself underground punk rock. The First Friday Variety Show invites the weirdly talented and talented weirdoes to strut their stuff in front of a like-minded audience at the Miramar Theatre. Dead Man’s Carnival emphasizes crowd interaction and improvisation, so be prepared to be involved. Beware or be excited: The show involves adult themes, dangerous stunts, strong language and partial nudity. Leave your bourgeois sensibilities at the door. (Tyler Friedman)


The Wild Party

All In Productions

Next Act Theatre

255 S. Water St.
Sept. 2-17

After an impressive inaugural season that included an inventive reimagining of Little Shop of Horrors, Milwaukee’s All In Productions kicks off its second year with a considerably less common musical, Andrew Lippa’s The Wild Party. Set in the Roaring Twenties, it introduces a couple whose volatile relationship is tested during a raucous party at their Manhattan apartment filled with socialites, hustlers and hedonists. Robby McGhee directs. (Evan Rytlewski)

 

Moon Over Buffalo

Sunset Playhouse

Sept. 8-25

  

Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill

Milwaukee Rep (Stackner)

Patty and Jay Baker Theater Complex

108 E. Wells St.

Sept. 9-Oct. 30 

Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill is set at the end of the 1950s as Billie Holiday’s life was coming to its tragic close. The musical finds Lady Day (as Holiday was dubbed by tenor saxophonist Lester Young, who had a penchant for crafting nicknames by affixing “lady” to someone’s name) at one of her final gigs at a small bar in Philadelphia. Critically acclaimed actress-vocalist Alexis J. Roberts captures the poignant pathos of Lady Day’s music in classics including “God Bless the Child,” “Strange Fruit” and “What a Little Moonlight Can Do.” (Tyler Friedman)

  

“Third Annual Br!nk New Play Festival”

Renaissance Theaterworks

Sept. 8-13

 

Upright Citizens Brigade

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Wilson Theatre at Vogel Hall

Sept. 16


Lend Me A Tenor

Racine Theatre Guild
Racine Theatre
2519 Northwestern Ave., Racine
Sept. 16-Oct. 2

Racine Theatre Guild takes on Ken Ludwig’s farce with characters, mistaken identities and chases as comic and exaggerated as the best episode of Looney Tunes. An opera company’s assistant manager takes the place of one of their visiting performers when the celebrated Tito Morelli drinks ’til he drops—and then wakes up to take back his role. But the manager’s already on stage and crazy ladies and bellhops are in the way! (Katie Hauger)


Gypsy

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Sept. 16-Oct. 2

 

Theatre/Schmeatre

Over Our Head Players

Sixth Street Theatre

318 Sixth St.

Sept. 16-Oct. 8

Live from Racine: It’s Over Our Head! This long-running sketch comedy show returns with another multiple-weekend presentation this fall. The topical-satirical package has a solid commitment to bringing original comedic works, written by the people, and delivering them to an intimate stage in a format that includes music by emerging local artists to break-up the funny. Audiences love this format. The limited run of live popular-format shows often sells out. (Russ Bickerstaff)

 

Man of La Mancha

Milwaukee Rep (Powerhouse)

Sept. 20-Oct. 30

 

A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur

Milwaukee Chamber Theatre

Sept. 21-Oct. 16

 

A Passage to India

Off The Wall Theatre

Sept. 22-Oct. 2

 

“Elect to Laugh with Will Durst” (special event)

Sunset Playhouse

Sept. 23-24

 

Play It Again, Sam

Bay Players

Whitefish Bay High School

1200 E. Fairmount Ave.

Sept. 23-Oct. 1

“Play It Again, Sam” is Humphrey Bogart’s famous (and misquoted) demand to hear “As Time Goes By” in the 1942 classic film Casablanca. Although the quote is best known as the title of a 1973 Woody Allen film, it originally named a successful 1969 Broadway show written by and starring Allen that helped establish the young comedian’s budding reputation. The plot is classic Allen, involving a newly divorced nebbish who is aided in matters of romance by a phantasied Bogart. Neurotic hilarity ensues. (Tyler Friedman)


Cookin’ with Gus

Memories Dinner Theater

1077 Lake Drive, Port Washington

Sept. 27-Oct. 12 

Hilarity and hijinks ensue as well-known food writer and cookbook author Gussie Richardson is given the chance to have her very own TV cooking show. Professionally, she’s fully up to the task, but there’s a problem: Gussie has major stage fright. Jim Brochu’s comedy revolves around the efforts of Gussie’s well-meaning husband and a neighbor trying to cure her condition before her first date with the dreaded camera. Memories Dinner Theater’s dinner theater offers a hearty meal to accompany the onstage mayhem. (John Jahn)

 

The Royale

Milwaukee Rep (Stiemke)

Sept. 28-Nov. 6

 

Blithe Spirit (student production)

Marquette Theatre

Sept. 29-Oct. 9

 

The Taming

Next Act Theatre

Sept. 29-Oct. 23

 

A Life in the Theatre

Alchemist Theatre

2569 S. Kinnickinnic Ave.

Sep. 30-Oct. 15

Longtime Milwaukee Rep resident actor James Pickering makes a rare, intimate studio theater appearance this fall as he plays a well-established actor in David Mamet’s A Life in the Theatre with the Alchemist. Sophisticated stage talent David Sapiro plays the younger actor learning from the veteran in a show directed by Milwaukee Opera Theatre Artistic Director Jill Anna Ponasik. The subtle backstage drama should resonate quite brilliantly in the Alchemist’s warm coziness. (Russ Bickerstaff)


You Can’t Take It With You

Windfall Theatre

Village Church Arts

130 E. Juneau Ave.

Sep. 30-Oct. 15 

Kauffman and Hart’s 1930s family comedy opens the season for Windfall Theatre. A comfortable studio theater in the heart of Downtown serves as home to a rather eccentric family in a staging of the play that inspired a popular movie and an ill-fated TV sitcom. A colorful cast of comic characters ricochets around a small space in the service of a script that was likely as fun to write as it often is to watch. (Russ Bickerstaff)

DANCE

OPENING:

First Friday Series

Real Time

Various locations

Sept. 2

A year and a half into its run, Andrea and Daniel Burkholder are extending their monthly First Friday Series indefinitely. Since June, they’ve turned iterant, taking their hour-long pay-what-you-will dance, music and performance art happenings to interesting indoor and outdoor sites around the city and designing the 8:30-9:30 p.m. shows accordingly. Each tends to feature aerial dance, improvisation, guest artists, gratis drinks and good conversation. Both artists also present their unique work independently. (John Schneider)

 

Into the Garden…

Wild Space Dance Company

Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum

2220 N. Terrace Ave.

Sept. 8, 11, 13, 14; rain date: Sept. 18

Seen from Villa Terrace’s patio atop the bluff overlooking Lake Michigan, Roy Staab’s sculpture Shadow Dance appears as multiple linked rings floating magically above the Renaissance garden below. As you descend the flight of “water stairs” that bridges the spaces, the look of this sculpture made of Wisconsin grasses changes drastically. So will Debra Loewen’s newest site-specific dance transform at every turn as audiences descend into the garden to experience both works up close. (John Schneider)

 

Giordano Dance Chicago

UW-Whitewater Young Auditorium

Sept. 28 

MUSIC

OPENING:

Miscast

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Sept. 2

 

“Made for Milwaukee”

Present Music

Sept. 3

 

Prescription For Murder!

Sunset Playhouse
Furlan Auditorium

800 Elm Grove Road, Elm Grove

Sept. 17

Sunset Playhouse invites audiences to get in on the action at this cheeky murder-mystery fundraising event. The setting is a dedication ceremony for a cosmetic surgery research center, a star-studded event with a guest list that includes a power-hungry first lady, a controversial Supreme Court justice, a star quarterback and a cosmetics mogul named Mary Kay Revlon—any one of which could be a killer or a victim. Attendees can munch on appetizers while they try to crack the mystery. (Evan Rytlewski)

 

Wolfgang Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

Sept. 17, 18, 20

 

Dave Camac & Laura Joy

Schauer Arts and Activities Center

Sept. 23


“Emanuel Ax Plays Brahms”

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Uihlein Hall

929 N. Water St.

Sept. 23-24

Following several successful public performances in the ’70s, Emanuel Ax emerged as one of the most brilliant and versatile pianists in the world. Ax has always best excelled in the Romantic repertoire, and that penchant will be on full display as he takes center stage with Edo de Waart and the MSO for Johannes Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-Flat Major (1881). Also, soprano Rachel Willis-Sorenson sings Richard Strauss’ haunting and lovely Four Last Songs (1848). (John Jahn)

 

Alina Kiryayeva: “Moving Pictures”

Schauer Arts and Activities Center

Sept. 24

 

“Haydn to Reger”

Frankly Music

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

914 E. Knapp St.

Sept. 26

Frankly Music will kick off its 13th season with “Haydn to Reger, marking the 100th anniversary of composer Max Reger’s death (Reger started off composing lieder, chamber and choral music before switching to orchestral works). It also features well-known works by Joseph Haydn and Johannes Brahms. New Frankly Music musicians Jeewon Park (piano) and Michael Klotz (viola) will perform along with Frank Almond (violin) and Edward Arron (cello). St. Paul’s Episcopal Church serves as the perfect location for the performance thanks to the magnificent acoustics and intimate setting. (Stephanie Harte)


Branford Marsalis Quartet with Kurt Elling
Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts
19805 W. Capitol Drive

Sept. 30

His brother Wynton is widely celebrated as one of the most important jazz artists of his era, but Branford Marsalis’ contributions to the genre shouldn’t be overlooked, either. Unlike his traditionalist little brother, Branford has never been afraid to stir the pot: His controversial mid-’90s Buckshot LeFonque project was one of the era’s most credible hybrids of jazz and hip-hop, two genres that rarely pair elegantly. Branford’s latest album is 2015’s self-explanatory Branford Marsalis Quartet Performs Coltrane’s ‘A Love Supreme’ Live in Amsterdam. For this show, singer Kurt Elling will join his quartet. (Evan Rytlewski)

 

Sultans of String

UW-Washington County

Sept. 30

 

Violet

Skylight Music Theatre

Sept. 30-Oct. 16

VISUAL ART

CONTINUING:

“Super Natural”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Sept. 11

 

“Steve Feren: The Incredible Beingness of Light”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Sept. 11

 

“The Art of Collecting”

Charles Allis Art Museum

Through Sept. 18

 

“Material Girls Exhibition”

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design (MIAD)

Through Sept. 17

 

“Roy Staab: Nature in Three Parts”

Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum

Through Sept. 18

 

“Art on Tap: Early Wisconsin Brewery Art and Advertising”

Museum of Wisconsin Art

205 Veterans Ave., West Bend

Through Sept. 25

As anybody who’s ever visited a college dorm can attest, early beer advertisements remain an object of popular fascination. There’s something hypnotic and reassuring about these quaint relics from another era, and as the home of Miller, Pabst and Schlitz, Milwaukee hosts a veritable treasure trove of them. This exhibit displays some of the city’s earliest known advertisements, including Miller’s 1907 Girl on the Moon ad, which has since been immortalized on High Life bottles. (Evan Rytlewski)


“America Seen! Regionalism from the American Art Collection”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Sept. 25

 

“TIMELINE 2016”

RedLine Milwaukee

1422 N. Fourth St.

Through Oct. 1

The annual “TIMELINE” exhibit creates an outlet for RedLine’s resident artists to showcase their work over the past year. The two-year program allows participants to receive mentoring from experienced artists-in-residence and visiting national and international artists. “TIMELINE 2016” will feature works by Cynthia Brinich-Langlois, Jamie Bilgo Bruchman, Luke Farley, Katie Ryan, Jody Emery, Sue Lawton, Julie VonDerVellen, Lina “Lynn” Reif and Jake Hill. (Stephanie Harte)

 

“Precious Metals: Shining Example from RAM’s Collection”

Racine Art Museum

Through Oct. 2

 

“Waysides”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Oct. 2

 

“Featured Member Exhibition: Brian Breider”

Walker’s Point Center for the Arts

Through Oct. 8

 

“Emily Arthur: Endangered”

Museum of Wisconsin Art

Through Oct. 12

 

“From Rembrandt to Parmigianino: Old Masters from Private Collections”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Oct. 23

 

“Fo Wilson: Eliza’s Peculiar Cabinet of Curiosities”

Lynden Sculpture Garden

2145 W. Brown Deer Road

Through Oct. 30

“Eliza’s Peculiar Cabinet of Curiosities” is an installation by Chicago-based artist Fo Wilson. The installation subverts the traditional European cabinet of curiosity by imagining what objects a 19th-century woman of African descent might have collected and catalogued. What among the material culture of her European captors would strike her as curious and worthy of display? The full-scale structure of “Eliza’s Peculiar Cabinet of Curiosities” combines a cabinet of curiosity with a slave cabin that includes more than 100 found objects. (Tyler Friedman)

 

“Wence and Sandra Martinez: Woven Together”

Museum of Wisconsin Art

Through Nov. 6

 

“Wisconsin Photography 2016”

Wustum Museum of Fine Arts/Racine Art Museum

441 Main St., Racine

Through Nov. 26 

Every three years, the Wustum Museum of Fine Arts selects an out-of-state juror to choose which submissions will be featured in its “Wisconsin Photography” exhibit. Curatorial Assistant Liz Siercks said the exhibit gives a snapshot of what practicing photographers in Wisconsin are capable of. Although the photographer has to be from Wisconsin, the photos and short videos can be captured from anywhere in the world. More than 100 pieces will be featured, ranging from portraits to landscapes and showcasing a variety of techniques. (Stephanie Harte)

 

“Corot, Daubigny, Millet: Visions of France”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Nov. 27

 

“Gendron Jenson: Series on Resurrection in Nature”

Haggerty Museum of Art

530 N. 13th St.
Through Dec. 23

A Wisconsin native whose work has been featured in the Smithsonian and the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, Gendron Jensen spent his youth at Saint Benedict’s Abbey in Benet Lake, Wis. It was his experiences in the monastery’s print shop and his walks around the neighboring woods that inspired him to pursue a career in art. His drawings indulge his dual fascinations with nature and decay, and this exhibit compiles 16 of them, including hauntingly detailed depictions of a walnut shell and a raccoon skull. (Evan Rytlewski)

 

“Loy Bowlin’s Holy Jewel Home”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Dec. 31

 

“Duets: RAM Pairs Contemporary Craft Artists”

Racine Art Museum

Through Jan. 22, 2017

  

“Escape Routes”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

608 New York Ave., Sheboygan

Through Jan. 22, 2017

“Escape Routes” is the JMKAC’s major theme this fall, with a large group exhibition including work by more than 20 artists, as well as four solo shows in the center’s smaller galleries: “Gregory VanMaanen: A World We Cannot See” (through Nov. 6), “Emmy Lingsheit: Edge Effect” (through Nov. 20), “Michael Goodlett: Human Behavior” (through Jan. 8, 2017) and “Stacey Steers: Phantom Canyon” (Sept. 18-Jan. 1, 2017). Amy Chaloupka, curator for the group exhibition, says, “A multitude of weighty issues plague society today—whether it is climate change, political squabbling, threats of terrorism or personal dealings with debt, loss, childrearing or technology overload.” Through differing approaches and media, the artists represented in the program respond by exploring escapist tendencies. “Some artists examine the idea of ‘going off the grid.’ Others opt to shift attentions inward. Some delve into detailed processes that induce a sense of ‘flow’ that allows them to abandon present space and time,” Chaloupka says. (Selena Milewski)

 

 

“The Collaboratory”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through March 1, 2017

 

“Featured Artist: John Kearney”

Wustum Museum of Fine Arts/Racine Art Museum

Through May 12, 2017

 

“Jessica Calderwood: Fictitious Flora”

Racine Art Museum

Through July 23, 2017

 

OPENING:

 

“Rineke Dijkstra: Rehearsals”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Sept. 10-Jan. 1

 

 

“The Lives of Others: Portraits from the Photography Collection”

Milwaukee Art Museum

700 N. Art Museum Drive

Sept. 10-Jan. 1

 

The eyes are not the only windows to the soul. The clothes we wear, the wrinkles on our faces from smiles and sorrows, the confidence or meekness conveyed by our carriage; all of this speaks volumes. Consequently, photography is a voyeur’s art. Thanks to the new 10,000-square-foot Herzfeld Center for Photography and Media Arts, the Milwaukee Art Museum is digging deeper than ever into its vast holdings of photography. “The Lives of Others: Portraits from the Photography Collection” collects studies of the human figure ranging from formal studio portraits to ad hoc street photography. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

“Once & Again: Still Lifes by Beth Lipman”

Jewish Museum Milwaukee

1360 N. Prospect Ave.

Sept. 14-Jan. 8, 2017

 

Beth Lipman is a Sheboygan Falls-based artist whose work explores material culture through still lifes, site-specific installations and photographs. “Once & Again: Still Lifes by Beth Lipman” is a mid-career retrospective that finds Lipman inspired by 17th-century Dutch still life paintings. Lipman breathes new life into this historical style by translating it to new media with seven large-scale glass sculptures and eight photographs. Each sculpture is comprised of hundreds of individual glass objects, making their assembly a labor of love well worth the striking results. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

“Ximena Soza: Broken Dreams/Sueños Rotos”

Latino Arts

Sept. 16-Oct. 14

 

“Continuum 2016”

UWM Arts Center Gallery

Sept. 16-Nov. 3

 

Plein Air Shorewood 2016

Plein Air Shorewood

Sept. 17

 

“RAM Collects: Contemporary Art to Wear”

Racine Art Museum

Sept. 23-Dec. 30

 

 

“Sensory Overload: Clothing and the Body”

Racine Art Museum

441 Main St., Racine

Sept. 23-Dec. 30

 

The Racine Art Museum will present “Sensory Overload: Clothing and the Body” beginning in September. The exhibit features clothing and accessories by artists and designers including Heejin Hwang, Rachel Timmins and Yulie Urano. While the items on display are wearable, they act more as artistic extensions of the human body. Museum goers should expect to be pushed to the limits of how they think about the items they put on every day. (Rob Hullum)

 

OCTOBER

 

THEATER

CONTINUING:

 

Play It Again, Sam

Bay Players

Through Oct. 1

 

A Passage to India

Off The Wall Theatre

Through Oct. 2

 

Lend Me A Tenor

Racine Theatre Guild

Through Oct. 2

 

Gypsy

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Through Oct. 2

 

Theatre/Schmeatre

Over Our Head Players

Through Oct. 8

 

Blithe Spirit (student production)

Marquette Theatre

Through Oct. 9

 

Cookin’ with Gus

Memories Dinner Theater

Through Oct. 12

 

A Life in the Theatre

Alchemist Theatre

Through Oct. 15 

 

You Can’t Take It With You

Windfall Theatre

Through Oct. 15

 

A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur

Milwaukee Chamber Theatre

Through Oct. 16

 

The Taming

Next Act Theatre

Through Oct. 23

 

Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill

Milwaukee Rep (Stackner)

Through Oct. 30

 

Man of La Mancha

Milwaukee Rep (Powerhouse)

Through Oct. 30

 

The Royale

Milwaukee Rep (Stiemke)

Through Nov. 6

 

OPENING:

 

“The Magnificents Monthly Musical Showcase”

Dead Man’s Carnival

Oct. 6

 

A Life in the Theatre

Alchemist Theatre

Oct. 6-15

 

 

Dracula vs. The Nazis

In Tandem Theatre

Tenth Street Theatre

628 N. 10th St.

Oct. 6-30

 

The two-man show Dracula vs. The Nazis is an unapologetically wacky blend of history and horror. Count Dracula is called out of retirement by the British government to prevent the Nazis from using a magical device intended to render Hitler and his army immortal. Two actors handle more than 20 roles in this exciting romp through an alternate universe. Just in time for Halloween, In Tandem Theatre’s production is an opportunity to laugh at two of culture’s most frightening figures. Dracula vs. The Nazis is recommended for ages 13+. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

“First Friday Variety Show”

Dead Man’s Carnival

Oct. 7

 

 

Quorum

Theatre Gigante

Graham Chapel in Plymouth Church

2717 E. Hampshire St.

Oct. 7-15

 

It doesn’t seem like it’s ever going to happen. The current U.S. presidential race is going to come to an end, though. Just weeks before the election, Theatre Gigante will revive (with a few changes) their eccentric, beloved ’90s hit comedy that examines “human nature, democracy and the art of voting.” Written by Theatre Gigante’s Mark Anderson and originally produced with Theatre X, the revival will be co-directed by Anderson and Isabelle Kralj. (Russ Bickerstaff)

 

 

An Enemy of the People

The Company of Strangers Theater

The Underground Collaborative

161 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Oct. 7, 8, 14 & 15

 

Virginia-born Christian theater group Company of Strangers moves to Milwaukee with its first show—a 19th-century drama by Henrik Ibsen named An Enemy of the People. A doctor discovers that recently built public baths have been infested with a deadly disease. He encounters some difficulty in getting the government to shut down the baths due to financial concerns in a story that remains tragically familiar to this day. The drama emerges in a small space beneath Downtown Milwaukee’s Plankinton Building in October. (Russ Bickerstaff)

 

 

Suite Surrender

Falls Patio Players

North Middle School Auditorium

N88W16750 Garfield Drive, Menomonee Falls

Oct. 7, 8, 14, 15 & 16

 

Falls Patio Players have been entertaining audiences in Menomonee Falls and beyond for more than 50 years. This October, they will be taking on the 1942 Michael McKeever farce, Suite Surrender. This comedic (at times slapstick) performance depicts two bitterly feuding Hollywood leading ladies, Claudia McFadden and Athena Sinclair, as they struggle with each other and hotel management to claim ownership of a luxurious Palm Beach hotel suite ahead of a wartime USO performance. (Rob Hullum)

 

 

Jack of Hearts

Milwaukee Entertainment Group

Brumder Mansion

3046 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Oct. 7-31

 

This revenge play’s characters are driven by the need for natural steam in order to run civilization in their futuristic dystopian society. Jack of Hearts Assistant Director Amanda Hull says,We focus on works that make people think and send a good message, as well as pieces that can thrill and be immersive for an audience.” Love, loyalty, humanity and truth are tested using Shakespearean themes throughout the production. The Brumder Mansion’s intimate setting allows audiences to be placed in the center of the action while choreographed fights, singing and dancing happen all around them. (Stephanie Harte)

 

 

Disenchanted

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Wilson Theatre at Vogel Hall

Oct. 11-16

 

 

This is Washington Park. This is Milwaukee (student production; world premiere)

UW-Milwaukee Theatre Department

Helene Zelazo Center for the Performing Arts

2419 E. Kenwood Blvd.

Oct. 12-16

 

This is Washington Park. This is Milwaukee is a docudrama that tells the story of Milwaukee’s Washington Park area through the eyes of its residents. Instead of placing fictional words into fictional mouths, the play is based on its own process of creation. Professor Alvaro Saar Rios and his UWM theater students collected oral histories from Washington Park residents that form the basis of the play. This is Washington Park. This is Milwaukee was created in partnership with the UWM School of Architecture and Urban Planning. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

Fiddler on the Roof

Sunset Playhouse

Oct. 13-Nov. 6

 

 

Goosebumps The Musical: Phantom of the Auditorium (family friendly; world premiere)

First Stage

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Todd Wehr Theater

929 N. Water St.

Oct. 14-Nov. 13

 

Goosebumps holds a special place in the imagination of children. R.L. Stine’s beloved book series was both sanctioned by parents while also being subversively scary. This recipe has made the series enormously successful, with more than 350 million books sold. This musical version of Goosebumps by First Stage’s John Maclay and Danny Abosch adds memorable melodies and witty lyrics to the type of “intelligent” horror that characterizes the book series—and is sadly absent from so much contemporary “scary” literature. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

“David Seebach’s Illusions in the Night” (magic show)

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Oct. 14-16

 

Mamma Mia!

UW-Whitewater Young Auditorium

Oct. 17

 

 Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Nile

South Milwaukee Performing Arts Center

Oct. 20

 

 

Honk, Jr. (family friendly)

Milwaukee Youth Theatre

Lincoln Center of the Arts

820 E. Knapp St.

Oct. 21

 

The musical version of Hans Christian Anderson’s Ugly Duckling celebrates a theme of self-acceptance as Ugly, a cygnet who is mistaken as an ugly duckling, is rejected by everyone except his mother. The performance features a score by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe. Director-choreographer Dan Tellez says, “The songs are very powerful and will hit home with a lot of people.” Tellez was drawn to the piece since it teaches children the importance of family bonding and feeling confident in themselves. (Stephanie Harte)

 

 

OOHPIE versus the Big Bad Wolf (family friendly)

Over Our Head Players

Oct. 21-22 & 28-29

 

 

Macbeth (student production)

UW-Parkside Theatre Department

Black Box Theatre

900 World Road, Kenosha

Oct. 21-29

 

The classic William Shakespeare play features a Scottish lord who receives a prophecy from three witches that he will one day be king. The prophecy unravels a chain of murders and revenge plots, emphasizing the physical and psychological effects positions of power can create. UW-Parkside’s Theatre Department has received awards in the Kennedy Center’s American College Theatre Festival for the past four years and opened their innovative Black Box Theatre in 2012. (Stephanie Harte)

 

 

Cambrian (world premiere)

Cooperative Performance Milwaukee

Cooperativa

207 E. Buffalo St.

Oct. 21-23 & 28-30

 

Visual Artist Brennen Steines’ passion for geology and utopian studies drove him to devise Cambrian. The piece combines visual art with music and movement through dancers transforming themselves with clay on stage to symbolize metamorphosis. Project manager Eric Scherrer said this is the first time a visual artist pitched an idea to Cooperative Performance Milwaukee, which selects shows that are proposed and voted on by its artist members. The performance will serve as a very intimate experience with three dancers performing 20 feet from the audience. (Stephanie Harte)

 

 

Kitchen Witches

Racine Theatre Guild

Oct. 21-Nov. 6

 

 

The Drowning Girls

Renaissance Theaterworks

Broadway Theatre Center

158 N. Broadway

Oct. 21-Nov. 13

 

Just in time for Halloween, Renaissance Theaterworks opens its “Secrets and Lies”-themed season with the true crime-drama The Drowning Girls by Beth Graham, Charlie Tomlinson and Daniela Vlaskalic. The story follows three women—all drowned in bathtubs by serial killer George Joseph Smith shortly after marrying him in the early 20th century. Director Mallory Metoxen describes the show as a “fast-paced, spooky event.” Look forward to performances from Susie Dueker, Elyse Edelman and Marcee Doherty-Elst and a scenic design that Metoxen says creates a “space that gets littered with pieces of George” reflecting “the marks he leaves on people.” Nov. 4 and 6 performances will be followed by a staged reading of the one-woman show Duck. (Selena Milewski)

 

 

Where the Streetcar Bends the Corner (world premiere) and Down by the Zoo

Boulevard Theatre

Plymouth Church Sanctuary

2717 E. Hampshire St.

Oct. 22-23 & 29-30

 

The title represents a double bill. Where the Streetcar Bends the Corner is a world premiere by David Flores and Mark Bucher. Through original songs and stories, they’ll conduct a comic streetcar tour of Milwaukee neighborhoods and introduce such notable residents as Liberace, Frank Zeidler and Albert the Alley Cat. We’ll end Down by the Zoo, a little-known comic musical by Arthur Sullivan (of “Gilbert &”) performed with the Plymouth Chorale under Music Director Donna Kummer. (John Schneider)

 

 

Fiddler on the Roof, Jr. (family friendly)

Sunset Playhouse

Oct. 23-24

 

Letters Home

UW-Whitewater Young Auditorium

Oct. 25

 

The Book of Mormon

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Uihlein Hall

Oct. 25-30

 

Ghosts of War

UW-Whitewater Young Auditorium

Oct. 26

 

 

Victory for Victoria (world premiere)

Milwaukee Opera Theatre

Wauwatosa Woman’s Club

1626 N. Wauwatosa Ave.

Oct. 27-30

 

Milwaukee’s indefatigable small opera company continues to bring us timely, beautifully crafted world premieres. This new musical by Milwaukeeans Peggy Peterson Ryan, Susan Peterson Holmes and Alissa Rhode with an all-Milwaukee cast and crew tells the story of Victoria Claflin Woodhull, a leader of the women’s suffrage movement who in 1872 became the first woman to run for president of the U.S. (John Schneider)

 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Margaret Brate Bryant Civic Theatre Building

264 W. Main St., Waukesha

Oct. 28-Nov. 13

 

Director Rhonda Schmidt will stay true to the original script in which an adult Scout Finch narrates her childhood living in Maycomb, Ala., during the Great Depression. During the play, Scout’s father, Atticus, tries to defend an African American man falsely accused of rape, causing the family to receive backlash from their racist white neighbors. Schmidt hopes people who see the play will “get a fire in their belly about injustice and leave asking the hard questions on how to make things right.” (Stephanie Harte)

 

DANCE

OPENING:

 

First Friday Series

Real Time

Oct. 7

 

 

Sardarabad Dance Ensemble

South Milwaukee Performing Arts Center

901 15th Ave., South Milwaukee

Oct. 8

 

Chicago’s Sardarabad Dance Ensemble brings ethnic dance traditions to the level of artful expression. Not unlike Riverdance’s rendition of Ireland, Sardarabad offers a carefully choreographed interpretation of Armenia—an ancient land perched on the rim of Europe and Asia. The ensemble puts on a spectacle of sound, light and motion drawn from rhythmic traditions familiarized in the outside world by composer Aram Khachaturian’s Sabre Dance. Sardarabad will be joined by Detroit’s Arax Dance Group, bringing an ensemble of 85 colorfully costumed dancers to the stage during some of the numbers. (David Luhrssen)

 

“Splash Dance at Urban Ecology Center-Washington Park”

DanceCircus

Oct. 15

 

Scheherazade and Angels in the Architecture

Milwaukee Ballet

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Uihlein Hall

929 N. Water St.

Oct. 20-23

 

One-act ballets born of their music open the season. Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s orchestral suite Scheherazade inspired choreographer Kathryn Posin to stage tales from 1001 Nights. Sinbad tames a monstrous bird, Aladdin loses his lamp and wins his love, the young prince flies to the Moon to meet his princess and Scheherazade puts an end to a reign of terror with stories. Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring inspired choreographer Mark Godden to portray a Shaker community experiencing God in its own way. (John Schneider)

 

 

“Ailey II: The Next Generation of Dance”

Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts

Oct. 21

 

 

3d4all2c

Catey Ott Dance Collective with Marquette University Dance Department

Marquette Visualization Lab, Engineering Hall rooms 028 and 028A

1637 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Oct. 27-30

 

Marquette University Professor and Lighting Designer Chester Loeffler-Bell produces high-tech performance experiments in the Marquette Engineering Department’s new Visualization Lab (MARVL), where the walls become perfectly rendered 3D scenery of any sort imaginable. Marquette dance faculty’s Catey Ott Thompson will choreograph this Halloween spectacle with student and professional dancers appearing as “physical holograms” amid the stereophonic projections “like ancient echoes, or the voices of our teachers and their teachers back through the ages who’ve become our inner voices as we make personal choices,” she says. (John Schneider)

 

MUSIC

CONTINUING:

 

Violet

Skylight Music Theatre

Through Oct. 16

 

OPENING:

 

“Music for the Birds”

Festival City Symphony

Pabst Theater

144 E. Wells St.

Oct. 2

 

The music will surely soar at the Festival City Symphony’s first Symphony Sundays concert of their 2016-17 season. Maestro Monte Perkins leads the FCS in performances of classical works influenced, in some way, by the wondrous power of flight. There’s the sprightly overture to Johann Strauss II’s 1874 operetta, Die Fledermaus (“The Bat”); Ottorino Respighi’s genial, early music-inspired suite, Gli Uccelli (“The Birds”); a suite from Peter Tchaikovsky’s tuneful ballet score to Swan Lake; and Gioachino Rossini’s jaunty overture to his 1817 opera, La Gazza Ladra (“The Thieving Magpie”). What? No excerpts from the score to Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds? Right. The film had no music whatever. (John Jahn)

 

 

“The Romantic Era”

Kettle Moraine Symphony

Our Savior’s Lutheran Church

1044 S. Silverbrook Drive, West Bend

Oct. 1

 

The Kettle Moraine Symphony begins afresh under its new conductor-music director Lindsay Riemer this season with three concerts that collectively form a primer on orchestral music, with each focusing on a single musical era. The opening concert consists of three Romantic Era classics: Ludwig van Beethoven’s powerful Leonore Overture No. 3 (1806); Felix Mendelssohn’s picturesque Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage Overture (1828); and Antonín Dvořák’s gorgeous Symphony No. 8 (1889). (John Jahn)

 

 

“Brass Band-Animated”

Milwaukee Festival Brass

Cedarburg Performing Arts Center

W68N611 Evergreen Blvd.

St. John’s Lutheran Church

20275 Davidson Road, Brookfield

Oct. 5 & 22

 

“Brass Band-Animated” features music from various Disney animated films as well as classic Warner Bros. cartoons. Milwaukee Festival Brass Director Mark A. Taylor chose the theme to appeal to a wide audience by playing recognizable pieces. As Taylor says, “People often think of brass bands as only playing marching and classical styles. This type of music shows that they can actually take on so many different moods.” The performances feature music from Disney’s Frozen, The Little Mermaid and The Lion King as well as “Looney Tunes” cartoons. (Stephanie Harte)

 

 

“Songs of the Silver Screen”

Sunset Playhouse

Oct. 6-9

 

ACAP PlayMakers’ Show of Shows III

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Oct. 6-9

 

 

Sister Carrie

Florentine Opera

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Uihlein Hall

929 N. Water St.

Oct. 7 & 9

 

Theodore Dreiser’s 1900 novel Sister Carrie is about the American Dream: A small-town girl from rural Wisconsin moves to Chicago in pursuit of upward mobility. So controversial was the work (Carrie takes on a sugar daddy) that the book was published with an intentionally bland cover—the literary equivalent of drinking liquor out of a brown paper bag. The Florentine Opera is staging the world premiere of the theatrical version of Sister Carrie, with a score and libretto by Grammy winners Robert Aldridge and Herschel Garfein. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

In Nomine

Early Music Now featuring Fretwork

Oct. 8

 

 

Mozart/Antheil/Dohnányi

Fine Arts Quartet

Helene Zelazo Center for the Performing Arts, UW-Milwaukee

2419 E. Kenwood Blvd.

Oct. 9

 

UWM’s Fine Arts Quartet performs works of very different eras but with interesting similarities. The three composers on the program were virtuoso pianists, lifelong dabblers in all sorts of pursuits (musical and otherwise) and composers who truly excelled in chamber works. The pieces include Wolfgang Mozart’s cello-centric F Major Quartet, K. 590 (1790); German-Hungarian composer Ernst von Dohnányi’s masterful Quartet No. 3 (1926); and so-called “Bad Boy of Music” George Antheil’s Quartet No. 3 of 1948. (John Jahn)

 

 

“Fall Masterworks Concert”

Racine Symphony Orchestra

Frances Bedford Concert Hall, UW-Parkside

900 Wood Road, Kenosha

Oct. 9

 

The harp is one of the orchestra’s most beautiful instruments (in both appearance and sound), yet it all too infrequently takes center stage; much more often, it’s heard in the orchestral background or solo—but in the latter case, only for a few tender moments. The RSO’s first concert of their 85th season fixes that: Artist-in-residence Kelsey Molinari performs on the glorious harp for George Frideric Handel’s lovely Harp Concerto in B-Flat Major. Other pleasant-on-the-ear works scheduled include Handel’s Arrival of the Queen of Sheba, Henry Purcell’s Fairy Queen Suite No. 1 and Joseph Haydn’s La Reine (“The Queen”) Symphony. (John Jahn)

 

 

“Peace & Awe”

Bel Canto Chorus

The Basilica of St. Josaphat

2333 S. Sixth St.

Oct. 9

 

British composer John Rutter wrote his gentle 1985 Requiem following a parent’s death. As he explained it: “The music is not a complete setting of the Missa pro defundis…but instead a meditation on themes of life and death using a personal compilation of texts. Like [Gabriel] Fauré, I selected portions of the [traditional] requiem mass, and like [Benjamin] Britten, I wove other English texts into them to form a counterpoint to the Latin.” Other works including local composer Penny Corris’ Da Lifney cantata and Dan Forrest’s Words from Paradise complete the program. (John Jahn)

 

 

“Olympian Classics”

Wisconsin Philharmonic

Hamilton-Sussex Performing Arts Center

W220N6151 Town Line Road, Sussex

Oct. 9

 

For the Wisconsin Philharmonic’s season opener, Maestro Alexander Platt announces the return of “the distinguished British pianist Simon Mulligan in one of the great concerto showpieces by the immortal Sergey Rachmaninov [Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini].” This glorious work will be performed along with Peter Tchaikovsky’s emotionally charged and highly introspective Symphony No. 4 in F Minor and Milwaukee-born Michael Torke’s evocative Javelin—composed in 1994 but forever associated with the Atlanta Olympic Games two years thereafter. (John Jahn)

 

 

Webern/Haydn/Schubert

Philomusica Quartet

Wisconsin Lutheran College

8815 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Oct. 10

 

The Philomusica Quartet’s Oct. 10th concert program offers attendees three exemplars of classical music’s fine tradition of string quartets. Chronologically (and in terms of historical influence as well), the program begins with Austrian composer Joseph Haydn—regarded as the father of the genre—and his Emperor Quartet. Franz Schubert’s Death and the Maiden is one of the repertory’s most famous string quartets and a poignant meditation on finitude, written after Schubert realized he was not long for this world. Anton Webern’s Langsamer Satz (1905) proves the great atonal composer to also have been a master of more traditionally harmonic idioms. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

Donny McCaslin Group

South Milwaukee Performing Arts Center

Oct. 13

 

We Six Jazz Sextet

Wisconsin Conservatory of Music

Oct.13

 

“Jazzed Up”

UWM Wind Ensemble and Symphony Band, featuring flutist Jennifer Clippert

Oct. 14

 

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Kakadu Variations, Eugène Ysaÿe’s Poème Nocturne, Lili  Boulanger’s Deux Pièces en Trio and Johannes Brahms’ C Minor Trio

Prometheus Trio

Oct. 17-18

 

MKE Unplugged Presents: Klassik

UWM Peck School of the Arts Music Department and

Oct. 20

 

 

“Angst, Horror & Fun”

Present Music with Quasimondo Milwaukee Physical Theatre

Milwaukee Art Museum

700 N. Art Museum Drive

Oct. 21

 

Present Music has always been known for throwing parties and bringing other media together with contemporary (or recent) music. Now in their 35th season, Present Music has something special planned for Halloween. Artistic Director Kevin Stalheim describes it as a two-part event: Part one allows concertgoers to soak up the Art Museum’s exhibit on German Expressionist film and art of the 1920s. “The audience will also hear Present Music musicians adding sound to the provocative and ground-breaking art from the period,” he says. “Part two will bring Dracula back to life by performing live the music of the timeless film classic, Nosferatu.” (David Luhrssen)

 

 

O Sole Trio’s “From Pavarotti to Pop”

Schauer Arts and Activities Center

Oct. 21

 

 

“Things That Go Bump”

Concord Chamber Orchestra

St. Matthew’s Church

1615 N. Wauwatosa Ave., Wauwatosa

Oct. 22

 

“Play Me A Story” is the title of the Concord Chamber Orchestra’s 41st season and this is a Halloween concert of scary ones. It includes Prokofiev’s ever-popular “Peter and the Wolf with Bob Balderson narrating, Saint-Saens’ “Danse Macabre,” Sibelius’ “Valse Triste,” “The Witches Ride” from Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel and Mussorgsky’s thrilling “Night on Bald Mountain.” It’s hard to think of a list of classical pieces more beloved to me as a child. You never forget. This orchestra includes many talented students along with community volunteers. (John Schneider)

 

 

“Together As One”

Waukesha Choral Union

Our Savior’s Lutheran Church

145 E. Lisbon Road, Oconomowoc

Oct. 22

 

Waukesha Choral Union’s “Together As One” concert features excerpts from Felix Mendelssohn’s 1846 oratorio, Elijah, Op. 70, a work that was enthusiastically embraced by audiences at its London premiere. Indeed, Elijah was for many decades thereafter second only to George Frideric Handel’s Messiah in the esteem of both public and choral performers, alike. Additionally, the WCU sings arrangements of Yehezkiel Bruan’s Seven Sephardic Romances, and a piece called Turn Around the World—a collaborative performance by youth from both Waukesha North and Kettle Moraine High Schools. (John Jahn)

 

 

2016 PianoArts Competition Winner

Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts

Oct. 23

 

Manhattan Transfer and Take 6 Present “The Summit”

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Wilson Theatre at Vogel Hall

Oct. 26

 

“Halloween Pajama Jamboree”

Festival City Symphony

Oct. 26

 

 

“Folk Songs, Tales, and Legends”

Master Singers of Milwaukee

Various locations

Oct. 29-30

 

Milwaukee’s Master Singers, under irrepressible music director-conductor Eduardo García-Novelli, open their four-concert season with a program titled “Folk Songs, Olde and New.” The first performance takes place at North Shore Congregational Church, 7330 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Fox Point; the second (on the following day) is at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 20275 Davidson Road, Brookfield. The MSM, now embarking upon its 42nd consecutive season, is a highly versatile, adult, mixed-voice ensemble with members hailing from throughout the greater Milwaukee area. (John Jahn)

 

 

“Twist and Shout!”

Sunset Playhouse

Oct. 31-Nov. 1

 

VISUAL ART

CONTINUING:

 

“TIMELINE 2016”

RedLine Milwaukee

Through Oct. 1

 

“Precious Metals: Shining Example from RAM’s Collection”

Racine Art Museum

Through Oct. 2

 

“Waysides”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Oct. 2

 

“Featured Member Exhibition: Brian Breider”

Walker’s Point Center for the Arts

Through Oct. 8

 

“Emily Arthur: Endangered”

Museum of Wisconsin Art

Through Oct. 12

 

“Ximena Soza: Broken Dreams/Sueños Rotos”

Latino Arts

Through Oct. 14

 

“From Rembrandt to Parmigianino: Old Masters from Private Collections”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Oct. 23

 

“Fo Wilson: Eliza’s Peculiar Cabinet of Curiosities”

Lynden Sculpture Garden

Through Oct. 30

 

“Continuum 2016”

UWM Arts Center Gallery

Through Nov. 3

 

“Wence and Sandra Martinez: Woven Together”

Museum of Wisconsin Art

Through Nov. 6

 

“Wisconsin Photography 2016”

Wustum Museum of Fine Arts/Racine Art Museum

Through Nov. 26

 

“Corot, Daubigny, Millet: Visions of France”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Nov. 27

 

“Gendron Jenson: Series on Resurrection in Nature”

Haggerty Museum of Art

Through Dec. 23

 

“RAM Collects: Contemporary Art to Wear”

Racine Art Museum

Through Dec. 30

 

“Sensory Overload: Clothing and the Body”

Racine Art Museum

Through Dec. 30

 

“Loy Bowlin’s Holy Jewel Home”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Dec. 31

 

“Rineke Dijkstra: Rehearsals”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Jan. 1, 2017

 

“The Lives of Others: Portraits from the Photography Collection”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Jan. 1, 2017

 

“Once & Again: Still Lifes by Beth Lipman”

Jewish Museum Milwaukee

Through Jan. 8, 2017

 

“Duets: RAM Pairs Contemporary Craft Artists”

Racine Art Museum

Through Jan. 22, 2017

 

“Escape Routes”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Jan. 22, 2017

 

“The Collaboratory”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through March 1, 2017

 

“Featured Artist: John Kearney”

Wustum Museum of Fine Arts/Racine Art Museum

Through May 12, 2017

 

“Jessica Calderwood: Fictitious Flora”

Racine Art Museum

Through July 23, 2017

 

OPENING:

 

“Honoring Fifty Years of Watercolor Wisconsin”

Racine Art Museum

Oct. 16-Feb. 5, 2017

 

“From Nature: Feathers”

Racine Art Museum

Oct. 16-Feb. 5, 2017

 

“Día de los Muertos Exhibition”

Walker’s Point Center for the Arts

Oct. 21-Nov. 19

 

“Memory Theater: David Ross Harper”

RedLine Milwaukee

Oct. 21-Dec. 17

 

“Haunted Screens: German Cinema in the 1920s”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Oct. 21-Jan. 22, 2017

 

 

“Día de los Muertos Ofrendas”

Latino Arts

1028 S. Ninth St.

Oct. 28-Nov. 18

 

The sexy-fication of Halloween is evidence of how far our late-October holiday has strayed from Western Christianity’s take on it as a celebration of saints, martyrs and other dearly departed. But Halloween’s sibling, the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), is still a poignant remembrance of loved ones who have shuffled off their mortal coil. Ofrendas (altars, often visually striking, set up to honor the memory of lost loved ones) are as iconic for celebrants as the Colectivo co-opted sugar skulls. Latino Arts Inc.’s annual Day of the Dead celebration collects ofrendas from local, regional and international artists. (Tyler Friedman)

 

NOVEMBER

 

THEATER

CONTINUING:

 

The Royale

Milwaukee Rep (Stiemke)

Through Nov. 6

 

Kitchen Witches

Racine Theatre Guild

Through Nov. 6

 

Fiddler on the Roof

Sunset Playhouse

Through Nov. 6

 

To Kill a Mockingbird

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Through Nov. 13

 

Goosebumps The Musical: Phantom of the Auditorium (family friendly; world premiere)

First Stage

Through Nov. 13

 

The Drowning Girls

Renaissance Theaterworks

Through Nov. 13

 

OPENING:

 

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

UWM Theatre Department

Nov. 2-9

 

“The Magnificents Monthly Musical Showcase”

Dead Man’s Carnival

Nov. 3

 

“Ex Fabula StorySlam”

Waukesha Civic Theatre

Nov. 3

 

 

Venus in Fur

Off The Wall Theatre

127 E. Wells St.

Nov. 3-13

 

Off The Wall Theatre—the “biggest little theatre in the Midwest”—delights in staging subversive scripts and breathing new life into the classics. Venus in Fur, a “kinky comedy,” is a play within a play about the staging of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s 1870 novel Venus In Furs. The novel was the Fifty Shades of Grey of its day, and it is from this study of the pleasure of asymmetrical sexual power relationships that we owe the terms “sadism” and “masochism,” derived from the author’s last name. (Tyler Friedman)

 

 

“First Friday Variety Show”

Dead Man’s Carnival

Nov. 4

 

 

Prick of the Apothecary (world premiere)

Cabaret Milwaukee

Hotel Astor

924 E. Juneau Ave.

Nov. 4-12

 

Fresh off the success of last year’s Jealous Revolver trilogy, Cabaret Milwaukee is back with another spine-tingling variety show in the guise of a classic 1940s-era radio play. The already cult favorite series features a serialized dramatic stage play interwoven with stand-up comedy, live music, comedy sketches and dance. The new series, entitled The Apothecary, tells the sordid tale of siblings embarking on a life of crime during World War II. Part three, Revenge of the Apothecary, will take place in February 2017 at the Historic Pabst Brewery. (Eric Engelbart)

 

 

Run for Your Wife

Memories Dinner Theater

Nov. 4-13

 

I Love A Piano

Milwaukee Rep (Stackner)

Nov. 4-Jan. 15

 

Mole Hill Stories (family friendly)

First Stage (First Steps Series)

Nov. 5-20

 

The Big Blue Ball (family friendly)

Sunset Playhouse

Nov. 9-12

 

 

Two Rooms (student production)
Marquette Theatre
Helfaer Theatre

525 N. 13th St.
Nov. 10-20

 

Marquette University’s social justice performance of the year is a powerful play focused on war and the media. Written by Lee Blessing, the play moves back and forth between the lives of American POW Michael Wells and his wife Lainie as the negotiations surrounding his release gain national attention. Media and government interests and concerns about the matter are revealed to be more complex than they seem. Two Rooms is directed by UWM-based guest artist Bill Watson. (Katie Hauger)

 

 

A Laura Ingalls Wilder Christmas

Acacia Theatre

Nov. 11-20

 

The Foreigner

Milwaukee Rep (Powerhouse)

Nov. 15-Dec. 18

 

Translations

UWM Theatre Department

Nov. 16-23

 

Gigante Reads Excerpts from Spalding Gray: “Stories Left To Tell”

Theatre Gigante

Nov. 17

 

 

unSilent Night (world premiere)

Next Act Theatre

255 S. Water St.
Nov. 17-Dec. 11


Most local theater companies fall back on familiar favorites for their holiday productions, but Next Act is taking a chance on an original—and it’s a thriller to boot. When a 1950s radio host (David Cecsarini) is thrown off guard by a surprise visitor just as he’s signing off on Christmas Eve, he turns to his listeners for help. Edward Morgan directs this world premiere from Milwaukee playwright John Kishline. (Evan Rytlewski)

 

La Cage Aux Folles

Skylight Music Theatre

158 N. Broadway (Cabot Theatre)

Nov. 18-Dec. 23

 

It started as a French play in 1973, became an Italo-French film in 1978 and a multiple Tony Award-winning musical (book by Harvey Fierstein; lyrics and music by Jerry Herman) when it exploded on the Broadway scene in 1983. Given its lengthy history, wide acclaim and worldwide success, it’s somewhat surprising to know that the Skylight has never put on a production of La Cage Aux Folles. That all changes this season. Finally, all the glitter, glamour and gaiety begin this November. (John Jahn)

 

 

Elf the Musical

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts’ Uihlein Hall

929 N. Water St.

Nov. 22-27

 

This touring Broadway production, based on the 2003 holiday flick starring Will Ferrell, follows Buddy, an orphan who accidently gets brought back to the North Pole after crawling into Santa’s bag on Christmas Eve. After years of not fitting in with the other elves, Buddy discovers the truth and travels to New York City to find his real father. Director Sam Scalamoni says, “The fact that the story is present-day with current content really strikes a chord with people. Also, children and grown-ups can see it and they all have a great time.” (Stephanie Harte)

 

 

Lobby Hero

Milwaukee Chamber Theatre

Broadway Theatre Center

158 N. Broadway

Nov. 23-Dec. 18

 

Milwaukee Chamber Theatre’s theme this year is “Misfits,” and Lobby Hero hits the mark by focusing on a hapless young security guard for a Manhattan apartment building and his budding relationship with a rookie policewoman. Kenneth Lonergan’s script centers on a local murder investigation that brings the guard, his supervisor, the policewoman and her shifty partner into collision for a romp, which Director C. Michael Wright says “contains a bit of every style; it’s laugh-out-loud funny, it’s quirkily romantic and it has amazing dramatic power. Above all, it’s a wonderful little morality play.” Performers include MCT veterans Chris Klopatek, Sara Zientek and Andrew Edwin Voss, as well as Di’Monte Henning, making his debut here. (Selena Milewski)

 

 

Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical (family friendly)

First Stage

Nov. 25-Dec. 31

 

A Christmas Carol

Milwaukee Rep (Pabst Theatre)

Nov. 29-Dec. 24

 

DANCE

OPENING:

 

AXIS Dance Company

UW-Whitewater Young Auditorium

Nov. 2

 

 

Dance In or Take Out

Danceworks Performance Company

Next Act Theatre

255 S. Water St.

Nov. 3-6

 

For its 20th anniversary, DPC will perform individual dances from this mostly retrospective show gratis at sites across town. Here you’ll see them all. Dani Kuepper will perform the solo that marked her start with DPC. Her colleagues will perform her recent multimedia work along with other favorites. Choreographer Christal Wagner flips the title: Outdoor rehearsals on Wednesdays near the Intermodal Station at Sixth Street and St. Paul Avenue will culminate in an indoor world premiere. (John Schneider)

 

 

First Friday Series

Real Time

Nov. 4

 

 

Step Afrika!

South Milwaukee Performing Arts Center

901 15th Ave., South Milwaukee

Nov. 18

 

African step dancing, based in longstanding African traditions, uses the dancers’ bodies to create ecstatic rhythms through stomping, clapping, slapping and poetic speech while dancing athletically in groups and as soloists. This 21-year-old, Washington D.C.-based, international touring company has advanced the style and created an acclaimed repertoire of dances that describe major movements in African American history to the present. In the intimate South Milwaukee PAC, this should be explosive. (John Schneider)

 

 

“New Dancemakers: Reshaping Perceptions” (student production)

UWM Dance Department

Nov. 29-Dec. 4

 

MUSIC

CONTINUING:

 

“Twist and Shout!”

Sunset Playhouse

Through Nov. 1

 

OPENING:

 

Mariachi Flor de Toloache

Latino Arts

Nov. 4

 

Joshua Bell

John Michael Kohler Art Center

Nov. 4

 

Edward Elgar’s Enigma Variations

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

Nov. 4 & 5

 

 

A Cabin in the Woods

Milwaukee Metro Voices

Tenth Street Theatre

628 N. 10th St.

Nov. 4-6

 

Founded a decade ago, the Milwaukee Metro Voices is a residential company of quality local singers that embark upon a season of seven musical performances with A Cabin in the Woods, directed by Tessara Morgan. As MMV introduces the work: “Five college friends decide to spend their holiday at an old cabin far away from civilization with no phone service, internet or any means of contact. What could possibly go wrong?!” Obviously, lots. (John Jahn)

 

 

“Sensational Cinema”

Wisconsin Philharmonic

Nov. 6

 

 

UWM Faculty Composers Concert

Chamber Music Milwaukee

UW-Milwaukee Music Recital Hall

2400 E. Kenwood Blvd., Room MUS 175

Nov. 10

 

UWM’s Peck School of the Arts Music Department is a humming place—the sight of many band, orchestra and chamber music concerts performed every semester. Now in its 12th season, the faculty concert series (Chamber Music Milwaukee) “takes a fresh look at familiar works as well as explores rarely performed music in a wide range of instrument combinations” (per the school’s website). The works for the faculty composers’ concert remain TBA, but will surely be enjoyable and eclectic—as is the norm with these fine performances. (John Jahn)

 

 

“An Evening of Gilbert & Sullivan”

Florentine Opera (@ The Center Series)

Nov. 10-12

 

Peter Martin Trio

Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts

Nov. 11

 

Serge Prokofiev’s Romeo & Juliet

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

Nov. 11 & 12

 

Wolfgang Mozart’s Requiem (student production)

UWM Symphony Orchestra and Choirs, Peck School of the Arts Music Department

Nov. 11-12

 

Maurice Ravel’s Quartet in F, Joan Tower’s Night Fields and Antonín Dvořák’s American Quartet

Philomusica Quartet

Nov. 14

 

Pro Arte Quartet

UW-Whitewater Young Auditorium

Nov. 16

 

MKE Unplugged presents: “Midnight Reruns”

UWM Peck School of the Arts Music Department

Nov. 17

 

 

“Monks Singing Pagan”

Early Music Now, featuring Sequentia

Wisconsin Lutheran College

8815 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Nov. 19

 

A new program focused upon music pre-1300 arrives courtesy of the Sequentia trio: Norbert Rodenkirchen (flute), Hanna Marti (voice, harp) and Benjamin Bagby (voice, harp). The fascinating program—assembled by Mr. Bagby in collaboration with Cambridge University’s Sam Barrett—consists of monastic texts sung in the 9th and 12th centuries as well as pagan songs in Old High German and Old English praising such other mythic entities as Fortuna, Dido, Cleopatra and Hercules. (John Jahn)

 

 

“A Bit of Baroque”

Kettle Moraine Symphony

Nov. 19

 

Western Jazz Quartet

Schauer Arts and Activities Center

Nov. 19

 

“Edo De Waart Conducts Beethoven”

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

Nov. 19 & 20

 

“Thanksgiving”

Present Music

Nov. 20

 

“Guitar Center”

Frankly Music

Nov. 21

 

“Holiday Pajama Jamboree”

Festival City Symphony

Nov. 30

 

VISUAL ART

CONTINUING:

 

“Continuum 2016”

UWM Arts Center Gallery

Through Nov. 3

 

“Wence and Sandra Martinez: Woven Together”

Museum of Wisconsin Art

Through Nov. 6

 

“Día de los Muertos Ofrendas”

Latino Arts

Through Nov. 18

 

“Día de los Muertos Exhibition”

Walker’s Point Center for the Arts

Through Nov. 19

 

“Wisconsin Photography 2016”

Wustum Museum of Fine Arts/Racine Art Museum

Through Nov. 26

 

“Corot, Daubigny, Millet: Visions of France”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Nov. 27

 

“Memory Theater: David Ross Harper”

RedLine Milwaukee

Through Dec. 17

 

“Gendron Jenson: Series on Resurrection in Nature”

Haggerty Museum of Art

Through Dec. 23

 

“RAM Collects: Contemporary Art to Wear”

Racine Art Museum

Through Dec. 30

 

“Sensory Overload: Clothing and the Body”

Racine Art Museum

Through Dec. 30

 

“Loy Bowlin’s Holy Jewel Home”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Dec. 31

 

“Rineke Dijkstra: Rehearsals”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Jan. 1, 2017

 

“The Lives of Others: Portraits from the Photography Collection”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Jan. 1, 2017

 

“Once & Again: Still Lifes by Beth Lipman”

Jewish Museum Milwaukee

Through Jan. 8, 2017

 

“Haunted Screens: German Cinema in the 1920s”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through Jan. 22, 2017

 

“Duets: RAM Pairs Contemporary Craft Artists”

Racine Art Museum

Through Jan. 22, 2017

 

“Escape Routes”

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Through Jan. 22, 2017

 

“Honoring Fifty Years of Watercolor Wisconsin”

Racine Art Museum

Through Feb. 5, 2017

 

“From Nature: Feathers”

Racine Art Museum

Through Feb. 5, 2017

 

“The Collaboratory”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Through March 1, 2017

 

“Featured Artist: John Kearney”

Wustum Museum of Fine Arts/Racine Art Museum

Through May 12, 2017

 

“Jessica Calderwood: Fictitious Flora”

Racine Art Museum

Through July 23, 2017

 

OPENING:

 

“Martin Johnson Heade”

Milwaukee Art Museum

Nov. 18-Feb. 26

Poll

Should Paul Ryan demand that Donald Trump release his tax returns before considering any tax reform plan?

Getting poll results. Please wait...