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Roger K. Miller

The idea of a War Crimes Bureau in Nazi Germany sounds like a very bad joke, but in fact there was one. It was run by conservative but Nazi-despising Prussian judges dedicated to the principle, upheld by the Geneva Convention, that there wa... more

Apr 19, 2013 5:09 PM Books

Al Capp, creator of “Li’l Abner,” was a brilliant comic artist when comic strips were in their heyday, the 1920s through the 1960s. Brilliant is not too strong a word. There were several others, among them Walt Kelly more

Mar 6, 2013 3:28 PM Books

The idea of a War Crimes Bureau in Nazi Germany sounds like a very bad joke, but in fact there was one. It was run by conservative but Nazi-despising Prussian judges dedicated to the principle, upheld by the Geneva Convention, that there wa... more

Apr 19, 2013 5:09 PM Books

Al Capp, creator of “Li’l Abner,” was a brilliant comic artist when comic strips were in their heyday, the 1920s through the 1960s. Brilliant is not too strong a word. There were several others, among them Walt Kelly more

Mar 6, 2013 3:28 PM Books

In the preface to his Army of Evil: A History of the SS (NAL Caliber), Adrian Weale points out that there seems “to be an increasing disconnection between what the organization was and how it is now portrayed more

Nov 13, 2012 2:39 PM Books

Men are in deep trouble, and it would seem it’s their own damn fault. In The End of Men and the Rise of Women (Riverhead), Hanna Rosin lays out an impressive array of studies, statistics, stories and anecdotes... more

Sep 28, 2012 1:35 PM Books

In his introduction to Better Off Without 'Em: A Northern Manifesto for Southern Secession (Simon & Schuster), Chuck Thompson, an Alaska native now living in Oregon, asks, “What would happen if we simply jettisoned the 566,466... more

Jul 23, 2012 12:00 AM Books

“If you ever have to go to war,” Walter Cronkite said late in life, “don't go by glider.” Gliders in wartime do not always glide the way they are supposed to, and the canvas-covered, aluminum-framed one carrying Cronkite to co more

Jun 4, 2012 12:00 AM Books

What an unusual household Philip Kerr's must be, what with his wife and children presumably living a fairly conventional life in contemporary Britain and he a most unconventional one in the middle of Europe in the middle of the previous cen... more

May 14, 2012 12:00 AM Books

For a past writing project I interviewed about two-dozen ex-POWs concerning their experiences in a Chinese-run POW camp in North Korea. When asked what topic or issue most occupied their thoughts and conversation, almost to a man they said ... more

Apr 17, 2012 12:00 AM Books

The bitter irony running through Guy Gugliotta's Freedom's Cap: The United States Capitol and the Coming of the Civil War (Hill & Wang) is that the politician most responsible for constructing the country's physical seat of government i more

Mar 6, 2012 12:00 AM Books

With Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right (Metropolitan), Thomas Frank continues his corrosive critique of right-wing ascendance in American politics. In What's the Matter With Kansas? more

Feb 6, 2012 12:00 AM Books

In April 1945, as Russian artillery rounds fell like leaden hail on Berlin, a plain yet eerie ceremony took place in the bunker underneath the Old Reich Chancellery. With only two close associates in attendance and a hurriedly summoned city... more

Dec 12, 2011 12:00 AM Books

A book has to go a long way to live up to the opening, “I heard Daddy's gonna try to raise Randall from the dead. Call me.” Happily, Donna Johnson's memoir does, and in spades. Holy Ghost Girl (Gotham) is the most compelling, exquisitely... more

Oct 31, 2011 12:00 AM Books

When Jane Fonda was about to turn 60, she asked her daughter Vanessa to help her put together a short video of her life. Replied Vanessa: “Why don't you just get a chameleon and let it crawl across the screen?” more

Oct 3, 2011 12:00 AM Books

Molly Makepeace Jamison, a mid-30s Chicago-area suburbanite, wakes in the morning to find her husband, Bob, dead in bed beside her, one day after learning that he has been having “illicit nooners” with a friend named Shirley. Molly is sh... more

Aug 2, 2011 12:00 AM Books

Our libraries do not suffer from a shortage of books about President William McKinley, the Spanish-American War or the dawn of American imperialism, yet Scott Miller's The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn... more

Jul 18, 2011 12:00 AM Books

Is it permissible to laugh at Adolf Hitler? The opinion of Rudolph Herzog and many others is that not only is it permissible, but it is a necessary reaction to Hitler and all tyrants. In any event, Germans always did laugh, even during Hit... more

Jun 6, 2011 12:00 AM Books

I now have two books on my shelves with “American Iconoclast” in their titles, Andrew E. Kersten's Clarence Darrow: American Iconoclast (Hill & Wang) and Marion Elizabeth Rodgers' life of H.L. Mencken. They are fitting titles in both cas... more

May 9, 2011 12:00 AM Books

The epigraph to Philip Kerr's seventh Bernie Gunther novel, Field Gray (Putnam), is from Graham Greene's The Quiet American: "I don't like Ike." The choice of epigraph is as apt as it is pointed, for Greene did not like Americans, period, a... more

Apr 12, 2011 12:00 AM Books

Forgetting is easy. But not forgetting lies in a curious and complex place, journalist Joshua Foer tells us in Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything (Penguin), a beguiling exploration of the manifold aspec... more

Mar 22, 2011 12:00 AM Books

In the (admittedly small) thriller subgenre of historical European noir, two names dominate: Philip Kerr and Alan Furst. Bringing up the rear and not closing fast, if The Second Son (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) is any evidence, is Jonathan R... more

Feb 7, 2011 12:00 AM Books

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